In a land of insecurity, where curly haired kids wanted straight hair and heavy kids wanted to lose weight and skinny kids wanted to gain it and everybody wanted to be somebody else, the one true beauty was the girl who simply knew herself and was happy with what she knew.

- The Wonder Years

The Web is funny

Three years ago I was a Web Designer. Now I am a Front End Developer.

What will I be in the next three years? If FireFox OS has it’s way – a mobile Web app developer (something I’m partial to).

For those paying attention, these three things are not unlike one another – just different focuses or vantage points of the same ecosystem (the Web).

All powered by the same badass program of Sir Tim Berners-Lee that he gave away to the public some twenty years ago with a HyperText Transfer Protocol you might know of.

Know your Web history, bro.

Follow Sarah Fader on Twitter (@OSNSMom) and her blog, OldSchoolNewSchoolMom.com

I have two children. Before I had kids, everyone warned me about the terrible twos. Watch out, when your kid turns 2 they become wild and uncontrollable. All they say is “no” to everything and good luck, because that year is going to suck big time.

Well, I am here to tell you that “everyone” was wrong. Two-year-olds are challenging, but they are nowhere near as hard to deal with as 3-year-olds.

After dealing with two 3-year-olds in my house, I can tell you from experience that they are undeniably the hardest humans on the face of the planet to negotiate with. The reason? They don’t give a f*ck!

View Huffington Post for more.

How I Feel About the Web

The fact that I can keep in touch with old elementary schoolmates I haven’t known since I was a little freckle face boy shooting hoops at Oakview during recess. Classmates that I never really got to know at the time, but who grew to become awesome and inspiring people. And it’s because of the Web that I get to know that now.

Like perpetual motion: a never ending passion for programming. How most people feel about faith (I don’t care if I never get there, I’ll never stop believing that I can). And maybe it’s the fantasy of success that keeps me driven to pursue it.

Even if I end up spending 90% of my life trying to do it and failing. Even if I only get to do it for 1 year and then I can’t anymore, it’ll always be that puzzle I get a thrill out of piecing together and picking apart again and again.

It’s not necessarily the ends, but rather the means that justify this dream.

It’s a journey that keeps my cup full and my wants on low. And smiles plentiful.

Whatever makes you happy.

What the Heck is Shadow DOM?

Elijah:

How awesome is this?

Originally posted on Dimitri Glazkov:

If you build Web sites, you probably use Javascript libraries. If so, you are probably grateful to the nameless heroes whomaketheselibrariesnot suck.

One common problem these brave soldiers of the Web have to face is encapsulation. You know, one of them turtles on which the Object-Oriented Programming foundation sits, upon which stands most of the modern software engineering. How do you create that boundary between the code that you wrote and the code that will consume it?

With the exception of SVG (more on that later), today’s Web platform offers only one built-in mechanism to isolate one chunk of code from another — and it ain’t pretty. Yup, I am talking about iframes. For most encapsulation needs, frames are too heavy and restrictive.

What do you mean I must put each of my custom buttons in a separate iframe? What kind of insane…

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#ginger

I know more about Hip-Hop than you.
I will out-science you!

Find me at Founder’s tasting the latest seasonal.

New home owner. Web developer.
(That’s code for I know geek stuff).

Work hard, play harder (more hard, too).
Never tire of learning new things.
Dream big, but always stop to smell the roses.

Life can be fleeting and brief if you let it.
Laugh like you mean it.

What do you think about when you look out on the night sky?

I been thinkin bout forever.

@eliheiss

http://eliheiss.net

Julie Ann Horvath Describes Sexism And Intimidation Behind Her GitHub Exit

Elijah:

Respect to Julie Ann Horvath for standing up for herself.

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

The exit of engineer Julie Ann Horvath from programming network GitHub has sparked yet another conversation concerning women in technology and startups. Her claims that she faced a sexist internal culture at GitHub came as a surprise to some, given her former defense of the startup and her internal work at the company to promote women in technology.

In her initial tweets on her departure, Horvath did not provide extensive clarity on why she left the highly valued startup, or who created the conditions that led to her leaving and publicly repudiating the company.

Horvath has given TechCrunch her version of the events, a story that contains serious allegations towards GitHub, its internal policies, and its culture. The situation has greater import than a single person’s struggle: Horvath’s story is a tale of what many underrepresented groups feel and experience in the tech sector.

Horvath said she joined GitHub in 2012…

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generation-like-pbs
Watch: Generation Like (on PBS Frontline)

I think about this all of the time. My future and what I do for a living is sort of dependent upon it.

It is the commercialization (or, consumerization, if you will) of actions or sentiment from users on a Web site – to “like” something, to “share” something, to “follow” someone, to “check-in” somewhere.

They call it social currency. I see it more as identifying actions you wish someone to take on your Web site. Before social media, there was a lot more grey area as far as what a person was doing while they were on your site. With social signals such as a “like” button, or a “follow” button, we can easily identify the person’s interest when they interact with our sites now.

What intrigues me the most is in how it effects and changes the user experience of a Web site or application for the end user – in this case, author Doug Rushkoff explores the marketing and branding of big corporations through social media and how it impacts young people.